Tuesday, September 26, 2017

2017 CLA Show: Photos of Contemporary Hunting Pouches Display

 Contemporary Hunting Pouches

The hunting pouch or “possibles” bag evolved as a necessity for any user of a flintlock rifle as it allowed safe loading and servicing of the firearm.  Unique to each owner, they could be elaborate or primitive depending on  the time period or owners station in life.  Presented here are contemporary examples of both types of bags from makers Joe Mills of Owensboro, Kentucky and the Jud Brennan family of Delta Junction, Alaska.

Joe Mills made this Virginia style hunting pouch with vegetable tanned calf skin and lined with deer skin.  The fringe is brain tan.  This Virginia style design is similar to those of the late 18th and early 19th century,  An Art DeCamp Pennsylvania style screw tip horn complements this bag.  Charlie Wallingford made this antler handled patch knife with pewter bolster and silver end cap.  A Jim Chambers adjustable measure hangs on the strap.  This is my person bag assembled for me in 2007.


"What’s In My Bag"

White cotton patch material.

50 cal ball bag by Rich McDonald.

Hickory shot starter by Joe Mills.

Flat priming horn by Bill Smith.

Turn screw by Rich McDonald.

Pliers and ramrod puller by Larry Callahan.

Patch and ball puller by Larry Callahan.

Flint wallet  by Vicki Hast.

Brennan Family Bags

Jud Brennan, noted flintlock gun maker from Delta Junction, Alaska, has a large and talented family.  Immersed in the flintlock culture as they ere, it would only be natural for them to follow in their father’s footsteps and produce period accoutrements.  Presented here are three bags produced by the Brennan Family – mother Julie, daughter Abbe, sons Jesse, Seth and David.  These bags are Virginia style, gentlemen’s bags with elaborate carved horns and well forged patch knives.

Seth Brennan Bag

Virginia style bag with facing dragons on the flap.
Frontier type engraved horn with carved walnut end cap.
Antler handled patch knife with pewter bolster.
Antler handled vent pick.
Contemporary powder measure.

From the collection of John and Vicki Hast



Brennan Family Bag #2

Julie Brennan hand sewn leather pouch with facing quarter moons.
Jessie Brennan Tansel style horn (his #19 horn).
Jud Brennan curly maple handled patch knife with pewter bolster.
Antler handled vent pick.

From the collection of John and Vicki Hast


Brennan Family Bag #1

Abbe Brennan hand sewn leather pouch with Federal Eagle on the flap.
Jesse Brennan Tansel style horn with repair  (his #14 horn).
Seth Brennan curly maple handled patch knife with pewter bolster.
David Brennan vent pick.
Contemporary powder measure.

From the collection of John and Vicki Hast


Joe Mills Hunting Pouches

Joe Mills learned to work leather under the guidance of his father, Randall Mills.  However, Joe Mills advanced contemporary bag making to a new level with his unique ability to age and add patina to his bags.  This craftsmanship allowed him to take modern materials and make them appear 200 years old.  Displayed here are 4 finely crafted bags made by Joe Mills for myself, a close friend and our two sons.  They represent a variety of styles ranging from the more refined  Virginia style to a more primitive type bag.  All bags shown are actively used by the owners for both deer hunting and recreational shooting.

Joe Mills primitive beaver tail style bag with the initials P.H. and a pewter button.  Art DeCamp Pennsylvania style screw tip horn.

Jim Hayes antler handled patch knife with pewter bolster and end cap.
Contemporary powder measure.

From the collection of Peter Hurley


Joe Mills primitive style beaver tail bag.
Antique horn on separate strap.
Joe Seabolt hickory handled patch knife with pewter bolster and end cap.
Bone powder measure.

From the collection of Phil Hurley


Joe Mills primitive style pouch with coverlet interior.
Large antique horn on separate deerskin strap.
Tim Ridge walnut handle patch knife.
Small brass primer by Brad Mills.
Antler powder measure.

From the collection of John Tyler Hast

 Copy by John and Vicki Hast. Photographed at the 2017 CLA Show by Jan Riser.